Celebrating another Year

I have always loved being a 4th of July baby — guaranteed fireworks! But with each passing year, I’m more aware of our cultural obsession with aging. Anti-aging, literally speaking, is synonymous with dying. My dad used to say when asked about getting older, “It beats the alternative.” I reflect on this topic today, both as a marketer and as one being marketed to, on the cusp of turning another year older.

 

Fearing death is natural. So is not being thrilled with a gray hair or a new line around your eyes. What’s different now than in the past is the sheer volume of products and industries that are literally banking on our collective fear of getting old.

 

The billion-dollar Beauty industry leads the pack with its lotions and potions, tonics, serums, oils, ‘injectables,’ and scads of surgeries that all carry with them promises of looking younger and regaining what you have most certainly lost. Women’s magazines peddle exaggerated before-and-after makeovers, and several times a year, the infamous “Beauty at Any Age” issue — which I remember not so long ago stopped at the 40’s…. Vanity is one thing (and it’s healthy to have some), but the way we market and are marketed to with beauty products plays less on our vanity and much more on a fear of getting old and irrelevant.

 

The Health & Wellness world is cashing in, as well. Vitamins and elixirs, IVs, diets, smoothies, fasts, workout plans and machines and gadgets — all of it practically guarantees you will stay exactly as you are, right now, if you just sign on! Truly healthy lifestyles that include eating well and exercising regularly are the only real “fountains of youth,” and should be embraced for making us look and feel good and for protecting the quality of our lives. But even good health won’t make you a year younger on your next birthday.

 

The Fashion industry also capitalizes on the body shame and loathing that can accompany getting older, especially for women. There are garments that hold you in here, or make you look more round there. Designs and styles meant to make you look and feel more like your younger self … or your younger daughter.

 

So what? All of those things make people feel better, so what’s the problem? To me, the problem is that there needs to be some grace and sensibility to the whole aging game and it needs to be reflected in the products, promises, and marketing of the things geared to the aging public. And right now, not only is a lot of the messaging off-key, there isn’t a lot of it geared toward the 50+ market, in the first place. There is a real opportunity to reframe the offerings and messages to ones that empower this incredible 50+ demographic, which accounts for 50% of all consumer expenditures and spends $3.2 trillion annually! https://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-bradbury/the-7-incredible-facts-about-boomers-spending_b_6815876.html

 

And along with better products and messages, we need to keep our own healthy perspective. I am lucky to have around me healthy, personal role models who bring grace to aging, starting with my beautiful mother, an octogenarian who takes incredible care of herself and is very young at heart. Same goes for my older friends, in their 60s and 70s, who are living exciting, healthy lives that honor growing older vs. disparaging it (you know who you are and thank you!).

 

Don’t get me wrong — I’m not giving up my gym membership, fancy eye creams, or vitamins. But I want to shift my focus away from what you lose as you age to what you gain — more wisdom, self-acceptance, and gratitude for what you have. I want products and services to appeal to the active, involved, healthy person I am and continue to be, and not to a 50-something relic who needs constant improvements!

 

Living past our youthful prime is a privilege. There must be a way to do it that isn’t full of fear and the rather ungrateful desire to anti-age.

Finding Humanity In An Era Of Change

A perspective from Cannes 2018

By Sharon Love – CEO, TPN

 

Awards for Creativity. Big data. Provocative speakers. Branded beaches. Yachts, parties, concerts, and rose… Some aspects have remained the same over time but the annual Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity has definitely undergone some change—even in the four short years I’ve attended. Beyond the greater presence of big media platforms and the continuing corporate dynamic, there felt to me, this year, a shift in the posture of our industry. A humbling pivot that’s put many marketers in a defensive position. And for good reason. In a moment of transparency concerns, a tech explosion, and the fight for equality and inclusion, how does an agency or brand survive and thrive? The answer may be to rediscover our humanity.

 

Embracing the human spirit in creativity

The list of jobs gobbled up by robots grows each year. And today it seems feasible that new technology, big data, and in-house creative shops may replace the “agency” as we’ve known it to date. Angela Ahrendts—formerly CEO of Burberry, currently SVP, Retail, Apple— went on the offensive at Cannes during her panel “Reimagining the Retail Experience” championing the value of “the human business” with regards to technology, the digital boom, and the future of retail. She acknowledged the importance of technology (she works for Apple, after all!) but was purposely focused on the need for the human touch. At TPN, we share her opinion that retail isn’t dying, it’s merely changing. That truth was complemented in another great panel, “The Not So Secret Life of Creatives”, where they discussed how Pinterest lets you play in a virtual world to generate ideas that you later cultivate in the offline world. My takeaway? Those of us that adapt the most efficiently and find that right balance of man-and-machine will win moving forward.

 

Seeing each other human-to-human

As marketers, an important part of what we owe our clients is a clear delineation of who their target audience is. No one today should be wasting time or money marketing to the wrong person, even slightly. Data has made us more accurate, in a lot of ways. But as I listened to Faith Popcorn’s session, “The Death of Masculinity and its Impact on Creativity”, I was reminded of the limitations of big data. Her take on the constant blurring definitions of masculinity and femininity, and beyond, cannot be captured in data. It’s too nuanced and shifting. Perhaps one way to ensure we’re connecting with our audience in the right ways is to view them as people as opposed to males, females or other gender labels. That would allow us to avoid offensive or alienating stereotypes. Wherever we can, we should ask ourselves how we’d like to be approached by a brand—as a woman? As a man? Or perhaps just as a person of certain interests. That theme seemed to align well with the message Seth Farbman (CMO, Spotify) sent at his panel “Creativity in the Age of Resistance”. He highlighted the voice they give to artists to make positive change—with themes of inclusivity and acceptance of all rising to the top. Seth stressed that using Spotify’s platform for positive change has become “an obligation”. The nature of your brand or platform, of course, figures largely into your ability to deliver this promise. But overall, the thought of steering clear of any level of stereotype and bias is a smart one for the times.

 

Fulfilling the equality promise

Many sessions focused on eliminating bias from our business—both in our internal company structures and in our work. The argument for gender and racial equality as a business imperative has been talked about for a long time and now there is conclusive evidence that companies who have a diverse workforce and leadership team deliver better results than those who do not. Early in the discussions about the importance of diversity, the moral imperative for equality had to take a back seat to business to get all the people who needed to hear it onboard. So why are some brands so slow to act on this and clean up their act? I just saw on Facebook this morning an old friend bemoaning the back of her (unnamed here) breakfast cereal box. It was a heartland story of where the grains had been raised for the cereal and featured the family of farmers who had grown it—there was not ONE female in the picture! It was kind of shocking. But there is reason for hope that the cereal box debacle will be a thing of the past. At one of my favorite panels, “Agents of Change”, featuring Katie Couric, Queen Latifah, Madonna Badger, and Mark Pritchard—they shared that though 29% of ads still portray women negatively or inappropriately, that number is down from 51% just two years ago. It seems like the hard work is beginning to pay off. As Omnicom’s Chief Diversity Officer, Tiffany R. Warren stated in her panel “Diversity—a Values Issue and Business Imperative”: “Diverse teams mean diverse thinking. We need representation in front of and behind the camera at every level, so we can normalize what used to be marginalized.”

 

Applying the good in tech

The power to ‘do good’ using data & technology is very exciting—both as a human being and as a marketer. One compelling session I attended, entitled “Androids, AI and the Future of Creativity” touted a function of new technology as a way for humans to understand what it really means to be human—when you interact with a robot, you begin to appreciate the things it can’t do that a human can. But the flip side (the dark side, if you will) of what data & technology have already wrought is concerning. We need good and responsible data and tech to win the day. Simply vilifying data/tech as bad (taking our jobs way!) or dangerous (destroying our privacy, rigging our elections) is to ignore all of the good it can do, and has done. The opportunity to connect our audiences with relevant, uplifting, and helpful content has never been greater. Our customers look to us to provide helpful information. It’s a great responsibility. But as we work to utilize the ever-expanding network of data, and the power of platforms like Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Instagram plus technology like AI, machine learning, and Voice, we need to (somehow) avoid fueling the increasing dependence our audiences have on mobile and social media as personal validation. As Scott Hagedorn, Chief Executive of Hearts & Science pointed out, it’s led to a rise in depression and anxiety (not to mention a polarizing political divide unlike anything we’ve ever seen). It will take human understanding and intervention to help brands utilize the power of data and technology in a transparent, positive, and ethical manner. And the ones who do so will win the ongoing trust of consumers.

 

For an industry a bit on its heels, the unity, positivity, and human spirit in the air at Cannes was palpable. Hopefully, as marketers, creators, thinkers, and—most importantly—humans, we continue to respect the huge responsibility we have to the brands and consumers we serve and harness our platforms and power to make real change, for good.