Why I don’t believe in “The Retail Apocalypse”

So much is being written about a “retail apocalypse” and many spent 2017 talking about the death of brick and mortar.

However, despite what pessimists might say, shoppers and data are telling us a slightly different story and the stats just don’t support such a doom and gloom situation…

  • 4,080 net new stores opened in 2017 (more than the number of stores that closed)
  • 71% of US shoppers still prefer to buy in-store (even if the product is available on-line)
  • 85% of US shoppers want to shop in-store because they want to “touch and feel” before they buy
  • 66% of millennial find store associates “extremely important to their shopping experience”

Sure, certain categories like Fast Fashion and Beauty have taken a hit in-store, but 2017 saw significant store count growth for the Dollars (General and Tree), value brands like T.J. Maxx, Grocers; Lidl and Aldi and beauty brands Sally Beauty and Ulta are demonstrating that brick and mortar retailers are still essential in today’s shopping ecosystem.

An evolution is taking place and brick and mortar retail is at the core.

What is changing are shoppers expectations and what they are looking for when they walk into a store. The right assortment at a good price is no longer enough. Today’s shoppers want more AND they want what they want immediately and they want to have an enjoyable experience. The “currency” of shopper satisfaction is now comprised of Value, Convenience, Discovery and Experience tightly wrapped in Personalization and topped with a shiny bow that is Technology.

While this may sound complex, it represents an opportunity that brick and mortar stores are uniquely positioned to deliver if they take advantage of all of their assets and ensure they are working together toward a common goal of delivering on what the shopper wants. By leveraging an entire store environment, associates on the floor, internal systems/operations and the right technology, retailers can create a “surround sound” affect to ensure the shopper walks out satisfied.

To do this, brick and mortar retailers have to abandon the “one size fits all” approach and move towards having a variety of store footprints that can deliver different brand and shopping experiences. Showrooms, express, pop-up, shop in shops (and a few that have yet to be revealed) all have a purpose and are here to stay. Within those store types, successful retailers can define the role of their associates and provide them with the proper tools and tech to support all shopper needs from basic fulfillment to expert advice. Systems and operations must move beyond self-check-in and inventory-control to be truly connected and assist in the delivery of a seam-less, frictionless, even channel-less shopping experience. That is what shoppers want and expect today – even if retailers aren’t structured to deliver it that way. Connecting on-line to off-line is a retailer problem, not a shopper’s, and connecting all of their systems and operations is the way to do it and make it personalized.

Brick and mortar retailers must become more agile and nimble, accept that partnerships and acquisitions are necessary to remain relevant and succeed. And most importantly, retailers must understand that piloting, testing, measuring and learning are essential and critical to continued success.

Written By: Tracy Faloon, TPN Chief of Client Integration

 

Sources: IHL Group, TimeTrade survey, ChargeItSpot Study, Fortune, ChargeItSpot Study

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